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and tonight, a city is on the edge. abc's david wright is there. david? >> reporter: good evening, diane. tonight, police officers across this whole region feel they are under attack. police headquarters here on lockdown. every entrance, every exit, heavily guarded. the entire police force in america's second largest city, essentially held hostage to one man who is allegedly bent on revenge. tonight, by air, land and sea, an all-out manhunt. the suspect, one of their own. 33-year-old christopher dorner. a former lapd officer, now an alleged cop killer. police say he isn't just targeting cops, but their families, too. >> this has gone far enough. you know, nobody else needs to die. >> reporter: the killing spree started sunday in orange county, with the baffling double murder of a popular college basketball coach and her fiance. monica quan and keith laurence, shot in cold blood as they sat in their car. only last night did authorities put two and two together. quan is the daughter of retired lapd captain randy quan, who was instrumental in getting christopher dorner fired. in a ra
being pushed and pulled in kansas city, to this car up in flames after revving the engine trying to get up a hill in kansas. inside the behemoth storm, it looked like this. visibility, probably about a quarter mile. and sounded like that -- there we go. thundersnow. highways were shut down from missouri to kansas. >> just got out of control, lost control, due to the weather condition. >> reporter: scary? >> scary, yes, it is. >> reporter: ice was an issue in parts of arkansas and missouri, where freezing rain made travel dangerous. at the storm's peak, snow fell at an amazing rate, up to three inches per hour. look how quickly it adds up in arkansas on this time lapse video, and engulfs this friendly garden gnome in kansas city. here's where the big snow goes next. parts of the great lakes and northern midwest will get up to a half foot tonight. but back in kansas, farmers say every flake is welcome. so, the water equivalent, probably just about 10 to 1, it's not much bigger than that. will that be good, or -- >> an inch of rain, an inch of water is good, we'll take it. >> reporter: dai
, when she was caught in gang cross fire tuesday. this city's mayor, rahm emanuel, announcing today 200 chicago police officers from the city's stretched thin force will move from behind the desk to the streets to target high crime areas. >> we need to work together to protect our greatest resource. the children of the city of chicago. >> reporter: pendleton was with her friends, underneath this shelter, trying to stay out of the rain, when she was shot and killed. and the violence shows no signs of slowing down. since her death on tuesday, six people have been shot and wounded in chicago. chicago closed 2012 with more than 500 murders. and as our diane sawyer heard during our abc news gang violence summit in chicago last october, it's all too easy to get a gun here. >> go behind a couple bushes, i bet there are some guns under there. >> reporter: community activist pam bozley lost her son terrell to gang violence. >> we need to get the murderers off the street, because if they do it once, they'll do it again. >> reporter: she believes the city's push for more police is a good start. an
destroyed right now. >> reporter: two of those lives were johnny and johnice dupree. he's the city's mayor and is alive today because he hid in a closet. >> i think god is testing us. >> reporter: across the street, the pittman brothers have no insurance and will lose the home that's been in their family for generations. so, your dad's ashes were -- >> they were in the front living room. >> reporter: did he die recently? >> yes sir, about two months ago. >> reporter: wow. maybe he was watching over you guys. >> maybe so. he had to be, i know somebody was. >> reporter: and there's still more severe weather on the way. potentially heavy snow and bitter cold for much of the east by the week's end. steve osunsami, abc news, hattiesburg, mississippi. >> thank you, steve. >>> and now, we have an update for you on the manhunt in california for chris dorner, the former cop accused of targeting fellow police officers and their families. tonight, more than 700 tips have streamed in. there is still a $1 million reward, the biggest in lapd history. abc's pierre thomas has the latest right now. >> repo
city, held the job for 12 memorable years left his mark. here is what he told "the new york times" in 2007. >> i loved the job. people loved me. we were a great match. i had sworn, on one occasion i said, at the western wall, i would never run for anything else because i wanted to be mayor for life. >> a larger than life figure, ed koch died of congestive heart failure at the age of 88. >>> tonight as millions of american families are getting ready for the super bowl weekend, one family has a happy dilemma. harbaughs, john and jim brothers, coaching the opposing teams. today, they made a little bit of history and abc's josh elliott is in new orleans. josh? >> reporter: that's right. here in new orleans it is the ultimate taste of sibling rivalry, two brothers separated by a mere 15 months, leading their respective teams now into the biggest of games which means tussling over 100 yards of turf and really, family bragging rights. they shared the world stage today. the first time ever rival super bowl coaches held a joint press conference before the game and definitely a first for br
. >> i never meant to hurt the city i loved. >> reporter: during nine years of hard gambling in vegas, atlantic city, and san diego, ms. o'connor wagered well over $1 billion. that's more than $300,000 every single day, more than $12,500 every single hour, waking and sleeping. her total losses -- $13 million. >> i did borrow the money from my husband's foundation. >> reporter: that's why she landed in court. over $2 million taken from a charity set up by the late husband. she'd already remortgaged her home, sold a hotel, auctioned her possessions. apparently spent her last dime. peterson died in '94 with o'connor by his side. she claims grief drove her to gambling. >> i lost my husband. i lost three of my siblings. i lost my two best friends. >> it can be triggered by grief, loss, stress, medications. gambling simply too much. >> reporter: o'connor also had a brain tumor during the gambling years. >> in the centers of the brain that affect and control logic, reasoning, and most importantly, judgment. >> reporter: ms. o'connor is now 66 years old, in poor health. broke. the court just
of snow for some of the biggest cities in the northeast and new england. the wind and storm surge, also a huge issue. our affiliates from across the region reporting on the deteriorating conditions. >> i can tell you i'm standing alongside one very, very angry long island sound. take a look out here. you can see the waves whipping up. the gusts are starting to come at us now. you get a perspective from the light just how fast and hard the snow is starting to fall. >> reporter: the roads are already horrible. >> the roads are so bad right now that i would honestly rather walk than drive. >> reporter: this section of i-95 in connecticut was shut down and even the plows are crashing. this one flipped in bedford county, virginia. in new york, long lines and fears of fuel shortages like after superstorm sandy. >> there is no need to panic buying gas for your cars. all indications are the gas supply is plentiful and deliveries will not be disrupted. >> reporter: at the airport, at least 4,500 flights canceled through sunday and delays felt as far away as los angeles. in boston, getting off th
bashar assad, becomes a city under siege. it is a dirty war, in a crucial country. just look at the map. the chaos engulfing syria threatens to spill over into iraq on one side, israel and lebanon on the other. a nightmare scenario for the u.s. the united nations now estimates that 70,000 people have been killed in the fighting, though no one really knows. a u.n. commission today called for war crimes investigations of both sides. assad's government, which has sought to crush the rebellion by any means necessary. and the rebels, many of whom are increasingly seen by ordinary syrians as war lords, gangsters and religious fanatics who regularly post videos of beheadings and other atrocities on youtube. damascus is quiet tonight. some light traffic. no one really walking around. 5 million people hunkered down, as the terrible war that is tearing their country apart has now arrived here, in fierce battles raging in the city's suburbs. syria's many minorities live in terror of a jihadist takeover of their country. before we came here, we visited christian refugees from syria who had fled to
expected west of kansas city by late thursday. now the nation's heartland preparing for what could be the worst storm to hit the midwest since the groundhog day blizzard in 2011. the snow may not be the only problem, and diane, it may not be the biggest problem. take a look at this storm system, when it finally gets together. what you're seeing on the ray door tonight is not even the real storm. the storm really kicks in tomorrow, getting all its energy. it has a layer of measurable ice and that's basically, already ice storm warnings out for northern arkansas and southern missouri. that's miserable ice, we think. and this line of severe storms from new orleans, including texas, all the way to mississippi. those storms could have tornadoes in them. we could be reporting on all of it during the day tomorrow. just something everyone should look for. >> not a little bit of everything, it's a lot of everything heading their way. >> reporter: a lot. >> thank you so much, sam. good to see you tonight. >>> and now, we head off to south africa and the big twist today in the case against ol
showing shanty towns that sprang up on decks -- tent cities that carnival has denied existed. outside, the 900-foot long ship checkered with towels and bedding. some unfurling white banners. right there, above the lettering -- carnival triumph. those dressed for the tropics, huddling in bath robes and blankets against the cold. the ship has been tugging 350 miles from the gulf of mexico at a pace about as fast as you can walk. until? >> i think the tug line might have broken. carnival's terry thornton said today the company's doing all it can. >> there is no way we can actually speed up the process to get the ship alongside sooner. >> reporter: misery tempered by joy today. choppered in generators, charging cellphones. the voices of loved ones, finally in range. and remember mary? >> she said, mommy, i'm afraid i won't ever get to see you again. >> reporter: so worried about her daughter. today they spoke. >> it was amazing. the things that she saw and the things we talked about, those things were really happening. why? why were they not prepared? >> reporter: we tried to take that qu
the presidential palace. terry? >> reporter: diane, life in this city under siege is surreal. it's traffic jams and business deals still getting done while artillery fire and bombing raids punctuate the air. everything covered in a blanket of dread. people here in downtown damascus, they're still trying to carry on. but the war stalks them, edging ever closer. this evening, smoke billowed from a strike on the outskirts of the downtown. the suburbs are the battleground -- for now. so, this is the first one? earlier, at a hospital in the christian quarter of town, we were shown some light damage from a couple of primitive mortars fired by rebels. it's another stop on this trip where we have been granted visas by the government of president bashar assad to tell their side of the story in this brutal civil war. as we talked to witnesses -- and you hear this boom, boom, boom, all the time? they hardly notice anymore. but it takes its toll. they all know it could be so much worse. in the damascus suburb of daraya, government air strikes have reduced much of the place to rubble. as they have in the no
: tonight, the storm brings up to a foot just south of kansas city. then, six inches or more around chicago by wednesday. so, let's talk timing of the storm. it will happen here tonight, from wichita to kansas city, or just south, some of the heaviest snows into early tuesday. then, the storm moves to the north and east through illinois, parts of chicago getting really hit by wednesday. the east coast, from all of this, going to get mostly rain. david? >> meteorologist ginger zee in the middle of it all tonight. ginger, our thanks to you. >>> and now, to the other storm brewing tonight, the one in rome, where scandal threatens to overshadow the election of the new pope. tonight, just as pope benedict has moved up the date of the vote, britain's cardinal, keith o'brien, stepping down, after reports that he behaved inappropriately. and now come questions about an american cardinal. abc's david wright at the vatican again tonight. >> reporter: today, britain's cardinal keith o'brien said he will not attend the conclave, because his presence would be a distraction. this weekend, a british newsp
. visibility is really bad. >> reporter: it's all the same storm that sent plows off the road in kansas city. and encased parts of texas and oklahoma. from above, you can see where the snow started and where it stopped. in wichita, the weight of the snow sent it crashing off this building. the snow so heavy and wet in missouri, this building south of kansas city crumbled. and in oklahoma, this roof killed a man after it buckled. >> we haven't had snow here like this in 20 years. >> reporter: shawn obermann fixes roofs for a living. he's had several calls today. >> these roofs here that are flatter, they can't take as much weight. a steeper roof, more pitch, the weight is going to handle it a lot better. >> reporter: get this. a foot of wet snow on your roof can add up to 20 pounds per square foot. that's like having several cars on top of your roof. experts tell us, if you hear any creaking or popping sounds, get out. and the next step? >> you can call a roofing company to try to get them to remove it. and that's your best bet. >> reporter: you see that huge tree right behind me into that ho
in traffic. how much? and can you guess which city is the worst? here's abc's cecilia vega. >> reporter: the sea of brake lights, back-to-back, bumper-to-bumper. a never ending commute hell. that's jim mccauley's daily ritual from new jersey to new york. >> can be really frustrating at times, you know? 45 minutes sitting in traffic, it tests your patience. it really does. >> reporter: we've all done it, sat here trapped in our cars, saying, "this is such a waste of time." but how much time are we actually wasting? one study did the math. all that traffic means commuters spend an average of 38 hours a year just sitting there. in that amount of time, you could have taken five vacation days. played nine rounds of golf. watched all three seasons of "downton abbey." >> i play solitaire on my phone. >> reporter: sure, new york and l.a. are bad, but try living in the nation's capital. washington d.c. is home to the worst traffic in the country, where what should be a 30-minute drive takes about three hours. >> there's a longer commute because they're going to drive further to get a higher payi
successfully tested a nuclear device for the third time. this one with enough power to destroy a city, packing about half the power of the bomb that was dropped on hiroshima. president obama calling it a highly provocative act and urging swift action from allies. >>> and the other big headline from overseas tonight, what we're learning about pope benedict. new pictures of the place he will live in retirement. and the call for a new pope who represents a changing world. abc's david wright is at the vatican for us tonight. >> reporter: at the end of the month, he'll have to move out of the apostolic palace, the pope's official residence since the 17th century. every previous occupant has stayed until he died. pope benedict will be the first to walk out the door. he won't have to walk far. today, the vatican revealed his retirement home is just behind st. peter's. a former nunnery with its own chapel and library. today, the vatican spokesman also disclosed new details about the pope's deteriorating health, revealing he has a pacemaker and he recently underwent surgery to replace the batteries. >>
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15